What President Trump's speech revealed about his plans to repeal Obamacare

A look at President Trump's ideas for Obamacare.

In his first speech to Congress Tuesday night, President Donald Trump outlined the overhaul he and his administration plan to make to the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare.

The proposed new health care plan now heads to the Congressional Budget Office and could face more changes as Democrats and Republicans battle over it in the House and Senate.

Trump urged Congress “to save Americans from this imploding Obamacare disaster.”

The president promised to repeal and replace Obamacare. Here are five key ways he plans to dismantle the current health care system.

You could be in a high-risk pool if you have a pre-existing condition

“First, we should ensure that Americans with pre-existing conditions have access to coverage, and that we have a stable transition for Americans currently enrolled in the health care exchanges,” Trump said in his speech Tuesday night.

A draft of revisions to the Affordable Care Act leaked to Politico on Feb. 24 references high-risk pools, although Trump did not discuss them in his speech.

States would have the ability to create high-risk pools for people with pre-existing conditions who are searching for health care. According to the draft, states would receive $100 billion over nine years in “innovation grants” that would be used to fund high-risk participants, news outlets such as CNN reported.

“High-risk pools would need a lot of taxpayer funding to work properly, experts say,” the Commonwealth Fund, a private nonpartisan foundation that supports independent research on health and social issues, tweeted after Trump’s speech.

You could receive a tax credit — even if you don’t deserve one

Tax credits and expanded health savings accounts could help Americans purchase their own coverage. It should be “the plan they want, not the plan forced on them by our government,” Trump told Congress.

Tax credits based on age, with the elderly receiving higher tax credits, would take the place of Obamacare’s income-based subsidies.

“For a person under age 30, the credit would be $2,000. That amount would double for beneficiaries over the age of 60, according to the proposal,” reported Politico prior to the speech.

The credits were also heavily criticized by some GOP members.


"So the headline is that the GOP is reducing subsidies to needy individuals when in fact, the growth of the taxpayer-subsidized reimbursements will actually increase,” Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) told CNN. “The total dollars that we spend on subsidies will be far greater. So you can be a millionaire and not have employer-based health care and you're going to get a check from the federal government — I've got a problem with that."

“What are tax credits & savings accounts going to do for those who don't have money to spend on healthcare in the first place?” tweeted Advancement Project, a national civil rights organization.

Chris Rylands, a partner in the Atlanta office of Bryan Cave LLP, says many people are worried that the tax credits will make it difficult for low-income participants to afford coverage.

Under the current system, many individuals eligible for a subsidy are immune to price hikes in insurance because the government picks up such a large portion of the cost. The proposed Republican system might make them better consumers, says Rylands, whose practice focuses on employee benefits.

“However, given the complexity of health insurance plans and the opacity of the pricing of health care services, it’s not clear whether individuals can really become well-informed consumers,” Rylands says.

You could lose Medicaid

Trump said his changes would give governors the resources and flexibility they need with Medicaid “to make sure no one is left out.”

Under the Trump administration’s revisions, Medicaid would be phased out within the next few years. Instead, states would receive a specific dollar amount per citizen covered by the program. States would also receive the ability to choose whether or not to cover mental health and substance abuse treatment.

“Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurer, providing coverage to nearly 73 million Americans,” tweeted the Commonwealth Fund after Trump’s speech. In a follow-up tweet, it said capping spending for Medicaid will reduce coverage rates and increase consumer costs and the federal deficit.

However, the Center for Health and Economy, a nonpartisan research organization, reported in 2016 that block-granting Medicaid in the states will lead to additional savings. H&E projects that the decrease in the use of Medicaid funds, by block-granting Medicaid in the states and the repeal of the Medicaid expansion, would be an estimated $488 billion from 2017 to 2026.

Rylands points out that this will not be a popular provision in Congress.

“What I heard here — although [Trump] didn’t say so in so many words — is that they want to try to turn Medicaid into a block grant program, similar to what was done with welfare reform in the 90s,” Rylands says. “However, I suspect many governors from both parties will not like this because it could mean states will pick up more of the tab for Medicaid.”

You could pay less for drugs

Trump proposes legal reforms to protect patients and doctors from unnecessary costs that make insurance more expensive and bring down the “artificially high price of drugs.”

Alongside medical device manufacturers and insurers, the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry is obligated by the Affordable Care Act to pay a yearly fee. It was determined the industry would pay $4 billion in 2017, $4.1 billion in 2018, and $2.8 billion each year after. However, proposed revisions to the Affordable Care Act include repealing the tax. 

Some consumer advocacy groups are hopeful that repealing the taxes will reduce drug prices.

“From life-saving cancer drugs to EpiPens, high Rx prices push critical care out of reach for those who need it,” tweeted AARP Advocates, a nonprofit advocacy group for senior citizens.


You could purchase cheaper health insurance across state lines

“Finally, the time has come to give Americans the freedom to purchase health insurance across state lines — creating a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring costs way down and provide far better care,” Trump told Congress.

Under the current law, many states have the choice whether or not to allow insurers to sells plans between states. However, even when allowed, there isn’t much incentive for health care providers to do so.

Difficulty building a network and attracting enough customers to create a large enough risk pool makes this option unappealing to insurers, the Center for Health and Economy reported.

Whether this proposed change will result in a healthy competition in the industry or in a race to the cheapest offer remains to be seen, says Rylands.

“This has the potential to undermine traditional state regulation of insurance ... since it would allow insurance companies to sell into a state without having to comply with that state’s particular insurance laws,” Rylands says.

MagnifyMoney is a price comparison and financial education website, founded by former bankers who use their knowledge of how the systems works to help you save money.

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