Two area beaches reopened, Fort De Soto's North Beach remains closed under swim advisory

Local area beaches reopened, Fort DeSoto's North Beach closed due to swim advisory

Update on June 10, 2017: Warning signs have been removed for Lassing Park and Maximo Beach. Both tested within the "good" category for Enterococci, according to St. Petersburg officials. 

Fort De Soto's North Beach remains closed under a swim advisory. 

Update on June 9, 2017: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - The city of St. Petersburg has deemed the beach North Shore Park safe for people to swim.

The city closed the beach at North Shore Park on Thursday due to high bacteria levels.

The poor quality levels are due to 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 milliliters of marine water, per St. Petersburg protocol.

Enterococci is a form of fecal streptococci and indicate that there is fecal matter from a warm-blooded animal in the water, according to the Department of Environmental Services.

St. Petersburg officials highly recommend that the public does not swim in the water until further testing is done. The bacteria poses a potential health risk to people in the water. The Department of Health in Pinellas County advises that the bacteria could cause human disease, infections, or rashes. 

Original Story on June 8, 2017: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Four local beaches have been found to have higher than usual bacterial levels and have been shut down to the public.

The poor quality levels are due to 71 or greater Enterococci per 100 milliliters of marine water, per St. Petersburg protocol. 

Four local beaches have been affected, including: 

  • North Shore Beach
  • Maximo Beach
  • Lassing Beach
  • Fort De Soto's North Beach

Enterococci is a form of fecal streptococci and indicate that there is fecal matter from a warm-blooded animal in the water, according to the Department of Environmental Services

St. Petersburg officials highly recommend that the public does not swim in the water until further testing is done. The bacteria poses a potential health risk to people in the water. The Department of Health in Pinellas County advises that the bacteria could cause human disease, infections, or rashes. 

For more information on Enterococci, refer to the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website.

 

© 2017 WTSP-TV


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