Local immigrants travel to Washington to fight for Dreamers

As lawmakers try to come up with a solution for DACA, some local residents are in Washington, trying to be heard.

A federal judge temporarily blocked President Trump's order ending the DACA program,Tuesday night.

That program protects immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children from being deported. 

President Donald Trump tweeted this Wednesday afternoon:

As I made very clear today, our country needs the security of the Wall on the Southern Border, which must be part of any DACA approval.

 

 

Now, House Republicans introduced their version of an immigration bill with President Trump's wishes, addressing the so-called Dreamers while also providing border security

DACA is an Obama-era program, which is scheduled to end March 5.

That’s why Sayra Lozano, a local Dreamer, is taking her concerns to Capitol Hill to lobby in support of the DACA program.

She's meeting with Sens. Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, along with representative Kathy Castor to name a few, to share her story about possibly being deported back to Mexico.

“It really is an unnecessary burden and just the worry that you feel that. Some friends I have here are losing status next week. It's just the constant worry,” says Lozano.

But Lozano isn't the only one fighting to keep DACA.

Pamela Gomez with the Florida Immigration Coalition is also headed to Washington in a few days to continue advocating for Dreamers.

“You're playing with people's lives. One day you're protected, and the next day you're not protected,” says Gomez.

“We're seeing business owners who have been here for 20 years having to be sent back to countries that they don't know,” says Gomez. “We're seeing the same thing with parents who have been deported who have U.S- born kids here and we're seeing a lot of family separation under this administration.“

These Tampa Bay women say they will continue taking action for the more than 33,000 Dreamers in Florida -- until a solution is made.

DACA was also a big issue when Congress passed a short-term spending bill to avoid a government shutdown last month.

On Jan. 19, both the House and the Senate must agree on a spending bill to avoid another shutdown.

© 2018 WTSP-TV


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