What are your rights at amusement park?

The deadly accident in Australia underscores the importance of knowing the law.

Florida is home to at least a dozen theme parks that are within driving distance of Tampa Bay.  Most have control over your safety.  That's because under our laws any park with more than 1,000 employees doesn't have to be inspected by the state.
 
What are your rights if something tragic happens to you or your family? Can you take the owners to court and prove they're liable in some way or are you agreeing to simply ride at your own risk the second you buy a ticket and walk right in?
 
A day at an amusement park should be fun, but do you really know what you're agreeing to when you buy that ticket? Are you reading the fine print?
 
"The next time someone does that, they'll be the first one to have actually read it. Nobody does. You're there for a fun day, you've spent a lot of money to be there for a fun day," said Attorney Phil Slotnick with the Burnetti law group.
 
"I know there's a lot of fine print on the back and stuff like that, but I've never taken the time to read it," said Matt Jones enjoys going to amusement parks with his family and he expects a certain amount of safety.  "The park should be responsible for the rides and the guests should be responsible for themselves."
 
Slotnick says that's basically what it boils down to and he used the tragedy at the Australian amusement park as an example.
 
"For instance, if the patrons were jumping out and trying to swim, they've assumed the risk of something bad happening because that wasn't part of the ride. I don't think that's what happened here."
 
This especially applies to children under 18. Slotnick says they can't sign a contract if they wanted to or even be expected to read and follow the fine print. 
 


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment