Do I need ID to vote in my state?

Before polls open across the nation Tuesday, do you know what to bring? It's good to have a photo ID, but not all states require it.

Two-thirds of states request some form of identification to vote. Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin are most strict about photo voter ID. In these states, if ID isn’t presented, the voter votes on a provisional ballot and must provide proof of ID shortly after. If information on IDs is not current (change in last name or address), voters might also be asked to fill out a provisional ballot.

Voters who have religious objections to being photographed, are homeless, are victims of domestic abuse or do not have ID because of a natural disaster may be excused from presenting ID.

States that do not require a document to vote include California, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming. You're also not required to have a document in Washington D.C. Find out more about your state’s voter ID laws at ncsl.org.

In all states, first time voters who haven't registered in person must present a valid photo ID or "a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the voter,” according to the Help America Vote Act.

USA TODAY


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