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Plant City, Florida -- Get ready to hit the gridiron for a good cause. The Tampa Bay Sentinels will take part in a charity flag football game, benefiting the MacDonald Training Center.

The game is Saturday, January 12, 2013, at 1 p.m. at the Otis Andrews Sports Complex at the Mike E. Sansone Community Park on E. Cherry Street in Plant City.

Not only is it fun, players say they're happy to be making a difference. And the money they raise will be making a difference at the MacDonald Training Centers in Plant City and Tampa.

The organization founded in 1953 helps children and adults with developmental disabilities to lead productive lives. One way they do that is by getting government contracts.

Jim Freyvoge with MacDoanld Training Center explained, "We're the sole packer and distributor of Sun Pass for the State of Florida."

The Center also teaches fine arts and has over 100 artists. The MacDonald training Center makes a difference in the lives of about 500 people a year.

This weekend, dozens of football players and the community will make a difference for the Center.

Freyvoge added, "The way we've been able to offset government cuts is by people coming in and becoming aware of our mission of empowering people with disabilities to lead the lives they choose."

Hillsborough Sheriff's Deputy Benjamin Williams, a former USF Running back, now plays for the Tampa Bay Sentinels. The Sentinels are part of the National Public Safety Football League.

Players are first responders. Williams added, "We have people from the fire dept, the military."

The Sentinels travel the country playing full contact football for charity, the MacDonald Center.

In the past few years they've raised about $20,000 for the Center. With this weekend's game, they will boost that total.

"It's all in fun. We're all going out there to have fun and promote for this charity and hopefully we'll have a good turnout," said Williams.

"The donations are what stoke our engine and drive our mission. This will go directly to people with disabilities," said Freyvoge.

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