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Dunedin, Florida -- Families are without a home, because of a giant sinkhole that opened up in a Dunedin neighborhood. They are now left searching for answers: how did this happen? How much will the damage cost?

The Red Cross has opened up an emergency shelter about a mile away from the hole at St. Andrews Church, where they are hoping to help relieve some of the pain these families are now experiencing.

See Also:Neighbors say holes hitting homes all over

But one thing the Red Cross can't do is explain to them how this happened. A couple of homeowners are just hoping all of the damage you've seen is insured.

"It's unreal. I am shocked," says Mike Dupre, whose home has been swallowed by a sinkhole.

The Dupre family says for the past couple of years, they've noticed their home had been acting funny, and that there was a sinkhole forming.They say they'd been trying to fix the problem with Citizen's Insurance.

But they were concerned with the way Citizens wanted it fixed.

"We talked with a lot of engineers," says Dupre. "We heard a lot of stuff that if you pump stuff in, it makes [the sinkhole] worse."

However, the family says Citizens instructed that cement be pumped into the ground, which began three days ago.

"Engineers presumed a correct way... Citizens said, 'No way.' Now, we are dealing with this."

GRAPHIC:Florida's Sinkholes (PDF)

Chris Coleman with the Coleman Insurance Agency says now the insurance company will be dealing with a "catastrophic ground collapse." He adds thatevery insurance policy has catastrophic ground collapse on it, but sinkhole insurance is something else.

"A sinkhole is shifting of ground," says Coleman. "You can see cracks, but no visual hole."

Coleman says although he encourages sinkhole insurance, it's very difficult to get.

"We had 100 people apply for it and four people got insured."

For the Dupres, they say they wish they never had to deal with the collapse, if the hole would've been fixed right the first place.

Citizens Insurance says when dealing with the Dupre home, they were following the Florida law that went into effect in 2011 which said they are required to hire a qualified engineer -- which they say they did -- and they do what the engineers recommends of them.

They cannot take another engineer's opinion that someone else hired.

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