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Tampa, Florida – Two big items came out of Day Two of the trial against Julie Schenecker.

Portions of her journal were read aloud in court, and her now ex-husband, Parker Schenecker, took the stand.

"It's too possible that they've inherited the DNA and live their lives depressed or bipolar," said Matthew Evans, a Tampa Police crime scene technician, while reading parts of Julie Schenecker's journal. "I believe that I've saved them from the pain."

In her writings, Schenecker outlined reasons for murdering her children, 16-year-old daughter Calyx and 13-year-old son Beau, in January of 2011.

It would have played into the defense argument that she was legally insane when she took the life of her children. But during testimony, Parker Shenecker said he saw no signs before being deployed overseas, which is when his children were killed.

"If there is a problem, I can ask Nancy to come … or I can find someone else to come in. The defendant at that time looked me square in the eye and said, 'I got this,'" testified Parker Schenecker, who never referred to his wife by name in court.

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Bay area attorney Joe Episcopo said that the state is using Parker Schenecker to paint his ex-wife in the worst possible light. He told 10 News he was surprised that the defense missed an opportunity by not questioning him in cross-examination.

"I would have asked him one question: 'Did you ever apply for a humanitarian reassignment so that you could help your wife with the children?'" said Episcopo.

Episcopo, who successfully defended a 70-year-old man in the murder of his wife's lover last May in front of the same judge in this case, said this trial's outcome will likely hinge on the doctors who examined Schenecker's mental state of mind.

"That's the only issue in this case … did she know right from wrong? Both sides have got to show that their side is better," he said.

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