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Drinking at the Gasparilla Pirate Festival? Learn about designated 'wet zones' for 21+ pirates

Yes, you are allowed to drink at the festival — but there are specific zones to stay in.

TAMPA, Fla. — Ahoy, mateys! We hope that you "arghhh" ready for the upcoming Gasparilla Pirate Festival.

With less than a week left before the festivities kick-off, all 21+ event-goers need to keep in mind the rules set in place for drinking.

Yes, you are allowed to drink at the festival — but there are specific zones to stay in.

Throughout the festival, there will be specific areas along the parade route and in Curtis Hixon Waterfront Park that are designated "wet zones."

Any consumption of alcohol along public property outside of the designated wet zones is prohibited, even in the surrounding neighborhoods.

There will be alcohol vendors scattered along the roadway in the wet zones specifically set up to sell to pirates and their krewes.

The city of Tampa also wants to remind all the pirates and wenches that coolers, kegs and vessels that "provide mass distribution of alcohol" are not allowed at the Gasparilla Pirate Festival.

Also, no glass containers of any type are allowed.

There is also the obvious rule of anyone under the age of 21 not being allowed to drink.

Click here to see a map of the wet zones for the festival.

Leading up to the festival, Tampa city leaders say the smartest thing you can do is make a plan ahead of time.

According to Tampa Mayor Jane Castor, that starts with understanding your "level of personal responsibility."

“We continue to encourage individuals to be vaccinated and to be boosted and if you are immune-compromised or you have other health issues then we ask that you stay home and enjoy Gasparilla festivities on television," she said.

Castor added that attendees should do their best to spread out along the parade route and wear a mask when they aren't able to.

All event-goers are also reminded to maintain a "bead-free bay."

“No throwing beads out on the water because everybody's aim is not so good, the catch not so good, and who pays for that but our sea life and we want to keep our bay beautiful," Castor said.