x
Breaking News
More () »

Tampa Bay and Sarasota's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Tampa Bay and Sarasota, FL | WTSP.com

Have you ever thought about how fireworks get their color? It's actually all science!

Pyrotechnics use chemicals to give fireworks bright pigmentation.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — It's fun to watch fireworks, but have you ever thought about how the different colors you see are actually made? 

It's all chemistry. Pyrotechnics use chemicals to make those bright lights.

Let's start with your basic firework. 

The source of most fireworks is a small tube called an aerial shell that is shot into the air before it explodes at a safe height.

This shell contains chemicals that create all of the lights, colors and sounds of a firework.

Inside there are small globs of explosive materials called stars. It's these stars that give fireworks their color when they explode. 

Credit: AP
Fireworks explode over Moscow buildings during the celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Nazi defeat in World War II in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, June 24, 2020. The parade is usually held May 9 on Victory Day, Russia's most important secular holiday, but was postponed until Wednesday due to the pandemic. But the timing allowed Russia to mark another significant war-era event — the 75th anniversary of the Red Square parade by troops returning home after the Nazis' defeat. (Yekaterina Chesnokova/Host Photo Agency via AP, Pool)

Typically, light from fireworks is produced by Luminescence. The explosion of gunpowder in the aerial shell creates a lot of heat, which causes metal salts in the stars to absorb heat energy and emit light. 

RELATED: What to do on July 4th around Tampa Bay

RELATED: Everything you need to know about setting off fireworks in Florida

RELATED: Where to watch July 4th fireworks on TV, online this year

As the electrons inside the atoms of these metals become excited by the heat, the electrons then almost immediately go to a lower energy state. 

That's when they emit light and a specific color. That color is based on the metal used like strontium, barium, sodium, copper or other mixtures. 

What other people are reading right now:

FREE 10 TAMPA BAY APP: 

Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Stay In the Know! Sign up now for the Brightside Blend Newsletter