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What you need to know for Thursday, June 17, 2021

Thanks for waking up with 10 Tampa Bay Brightside.
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Closeup view of Modern Suburban Home for Sale Real Estate Sign in front of modern home

TAMPA, Fla. — Good morning, Tampa Bay! The weekend is right around the corner.

Rent or buy?🏠

With the housing market hotter than ever, people are paying a premium and sometimes getting into bidding wars to buy a home. 

But is it smart to buy a home when prices are so high? What about renting?

We've all heard it, 'renting is just throwing your money away!

Not everyone agrees. A certified financial planner says in most cases, simple math shows that statement is just not true.

Here's why buying a home may not be as good of an investment as it seems.

RELATED: Rent or buy?

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Red tide

Water samples taken off the Pinellas County coastline in recent days indicate the red tide nuisance isn't getting any better.

One sample indicates the problem may be worsening.

That's near Redington Beach, where a high concentration of the red tide organism, Karenia brevis, has been reported in the past week, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

A new water sample returned a medium concentration near Clearwater Beach, FWC's latest report shows. Similar conditions were reported recently just south near Sand Key Park.   

At high concentrations, even the general public may experience intense symptoms of respiratory irritations -- not just those who are sensitive to red tide or would otherwise experience mild symptoms, NOAA says.

Here's how you can check for red tide in your area.

RELATED: High concentration of red tide measured off Pinellas County coastline, FWC says

Sunrise, sunset🌞

A giant plume of Saharan dust is blowing into Florida this week, as it travels across the Atlantic Ocean as far as 5,000 miles all the way from the coast of Africa.

The extremely dry and dusty air known as the Saharan Air Layer forms over the Sahara Desert and moves across the North Atlantic, peaking in late June to mid-August every year. Some are worse than others.

These Sahara dust plumes can cause more vibrant sunrises and sunsets by scattering more of the sun’s light in the atmosphere. A greater number of dust particles can refract sunlight into a range of purples, pinks, oranges and yellows.

RELATED: Saharan dust blows into Florida, vibrant sunrises and sunsets may develop