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USF Health virologist Dr. Teng talks about the pause on Johnson & Johnson vaccine

"Things like this rare clotting disorder, for example with the J&J vaccine, that occurs between a week and two weeks afterwards"

On 10 Tampa Bay, we’re committed to keeping you up to date with all the latest COVID-19 news.

That’s why every week we are taking your questions to a local medical expert to talk about what’s going on. From the latest on where Tampa Bay stands with vaccines, to monitoring the COVID-19 variants, we’ll continue tracking information.

Dr. Michael Teng, Ph.D., is a virologist at USF Health.

Here are some of the questions we asked this week:

Q: Was the CDC and FDA’s recommendation to pause the Johnson and Johnson vaccine the right call?

 A: “It was the right move to pull it, to put a pause on it. You look at it in light of: we have two extremely effective vaccines that don't have this rare side effect. It's not going to really impact our ability to vaccinate everybody."

“I wish they would have come out with a statement to say something about this because, again, this is an extremely rare side effect and just by pausing it without saying anything, they made a perception that there’s something hugely wrong. This is a really uncommon thing.”

RELATED: US officials seek more data on rare clots before next steps amid paused Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine

Q: We know there are side effects of the vaccine, but how long can they last? 

"Things like this rare clotting disorder, for example with the J&J vaccine, that occurs between a week and two weeks afterward, so that has to do most likely, with an immune response."

 “It's really difficult to say, depending on the specific symptoms that you have, but you know there are other viruses out there, cold-like symptoms, so it might be that. Allergies are big, especially with all the pollen in trees.”

RELATED: Sharper insight: Why do women have a stronger immune response to the COVID-19 vaccine?

Q: What’s the single most important reason that schools have not become incubators for COVID-19 and its variants?

A: "It's really just public health measures because we don't have a vaccine for kids. Masks, distancing as much as possible and contact tracing. If your child has Covid-like symptoms, get them tested. If they test positive, keep the kid out of school, so it doesn't spread as much."

You can send your questions to 727-577-8522 and we might answer them on 10 Tampa Bay Brightside. 

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