TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — As the number of measles cases continues to rise across the county, a fight is brewing among state lawmakers over a vaccine tracking bill.

Senate Bill 354 is making its way through the state Senate and could give some schools complete access to your child’s vaccination history.

Under the proposed plan, certain schools would be allowed access to your child’s vaccination history through the Florida Department of Health.

It would allow schools to keep track of it until your child is 23 years old, which is around the time when young adults are done with college. 

The proposal revises the current law allowing medical professionals to keep the reporting of vaccinations optional. This would make reporting mandatory.

Some parents like Adriene Fern are voicing their support of the bill.

“This is medical terrorism to our kids," Fern said of the state's current policy. "You’re taking your unvaccinated kid and it’s a threat that you're exposing to the general public.”

Another parent, Mollie Ryckman-Barrett, is against the vaccine tracking bill.

“I would opt out because I don’t understand how that doesn’t break every HIPAA compliance law," Ryckman-Barrett said.

Under the proposed plan, parents would be able to opt out of having their child’s vaccination records made public. Their child’s name would still be in the system, it would just say they opted out.

As the measles outbreak spreads, many people are getting concerned. Here are answers to most asked questions about vaccinations.

In New York City, measles cases are so high in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, the city has declared it a public health emergency. The city ordered mandatory vaccinations for people who may have been exposed to the virus. People who resist could face a $1,000 fine.

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