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Grounded 737 MAX planes take over section of Boeing Field while company works on software fix

737 MAX aircraft are filling up a section of Boeing Field in Seattle, while the company works to fix cockpit software and update pilot training.

SEATTLE — Boeing 737 MAX aircraft have taken over a section of Boeing Field in Seattle, while the company works to make the necessary fixed to get the grounded planes in the air again. 

Boeing is working to fix cockpit software and update pilot training.

Boeing's fix for its troubled 737 MAX planes will take weeks, the FAA said Monday, keeping the entire fleet grounded.

RELATEDRenton waits for answers about Boeing 737 MAX 8 crash

The company halted 737 MAX deliveries, but it continues to roll out new planes from its factory in Renton. Boeing is stockpiling finished aircraft, which will need the new software enhancements before airlines can take delivery and put them into service.

Some U.S. carriers, like Southwest and American, revised their spring travel schedules to reduce delays and cancellations during the grounding.

Air Canada announced Tuesday it would delay the launches of some seasonal routes until summer. Other flights have been suspended altogether.

The Norwegian Air CEO tweeted Tuesday that he was on his way to Seattle to address MAX issues with Boeing representatives. Norwegian is expected to take delivery of dozens of MAX jets in the coming years and said it would seek compensation from Boeing for costs and lost revenue caused by the MAX grounding.

RELATED: Boeing unveils fixes to troubled 737 MAX

A U.S. Senate committee is investigating whistle blower complaints about the training and credentials of federal inspectors who evaluated the MAX, the AP reported Tuesday.

The Commerce Committee chairman said multiple people have come forward to say FAA inspectors lacked sufficient training and valid certifications, and some of those inspectors may have been working on 737 MAX pilot training requirements.

The FAA said it will give Boeing's pending software changes a rigorous safety review and will not approve those changes until they are satisfied with it.