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What you need to know about mixing COVID vaccines as omicron variant emerges

Although much is still unknown about the new omicron variant, early research has shown that it may be just as transmissible as the delta variant.

As the recent omicron variant begins making its presence known across the globe, health leaders are urging those who are fully vaccinated to go out and get a booster shot. 

Although much is still unknown about the variant, early research has shown that it may be just as transmissible as the delta variant. That's why officials are saying an extra dose of the COVID-19 vaccine may not be a bad idea. 

So, let's say you're in the market for a booster shot but are having a hard time finding a dose of the initial Pfizer, Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine you received. Is it a good idea to be mixing?

Well, while it's not recommended to mix vaccines during the initial two-dose process, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says go to town with mixing and matching during the booster process.

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With news of the omicron variant, the CDC is strongly recommending booster shots for all adults as young as 18. Booster shots should be taken at least six months after receiving the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine, and two months after the one-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine. 

The reason, health experts say, is data shows vaccinations become less effective over time.

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While booster shots only recently received federal approval, the CDC says clinical trials revealed they increased the immune response of participants. An increased immune response, the CDC says, means increased protection against COVID-19 and variants.