x
Breaking News
More () »

Gov. Kemp signs new foster care, street racing and educational bills

Here's a look at what Governor Brian Kemp signed into law this week

ATLANTA — Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed several new bills into law this week.

Adoption and Foster Care  

On Monday, Kemp signed SB20, SB 28, SB107, HB154, HB562 and HB548 to make changes to Georgia's adoption and foster care process, and lessen the burden on adoptive parents. 

Gov. Kemp said HB154 and SB107 will "make it easier to adopt and further protect children in foster care in the Peach State." 

Additionally, HB154 lowers the age at which someone can petition to adopt a child from 25 to 21.

Other bills allow grant tuition and fee waivers for state eligible foster and adopted students at postsecondary schools, and adds more positions to the Child Advocate Advisory Committee

"Placing our kids in safe and loving homes is not controversial, and I am thankful to the General Assembly for working closely with our office on these important reforms in a bipartisan fashion," Gov. Kemp said. 

Street Racing

Gov. Kemp also signed a statewide crackdown on illegal street racing into law on Monday.  

HB534 states punishments for street racing, laying drag and other offenses. It also states penalties for habitual violators including fines, prison time and driver's license suspension. 

The bill also expands on what can be considered reckless driving. 

Education

On Tuesday, Gov. Kemp signed a teacher pipeline bill, SB88, at Kennesaw State University.

The bill is aimed at "recruiting, preparing, mentoring and retaining Georgia teachers." 

SB88 also allows some retired teachers to return to work, and be able to collect their full salaries and pensions. 

The bill calls for the recruitment of more teachers from the military and historically Black colleges and universities. 

Gov. Kemp also signed educational bills SB 59, SB 66, SB 153, SB 159, and SB 213

SB66 authorizes a nonprofit corporation within the Georgia Foundation for Public Education to receive private donations to be used for public school grants.