When a baby is born premature, one of the only ways mom can hold her baby is snuggled close on her chest, skin to skin, heart to heart, because the baby is so small and can get cold so easily.

It's called kangaroo care and it is good for all babies.

"I heard that little cry and it was just perfect." Keyshonda Hill-Fitzgerald said of her baby girl.

Rylee was born two months premature, weighing just 3.8 pounds.

"She was in the incubator for like a week and a half and she was regulating herself after like a week and a half and she was strong enough to get out," Hill-Fitzgerald said.

Finally, Hill-Fitzgerald said could hold her baby girl. She was encouraged to do kangaroo care, to hold little Rylee in just a diaper skin to skin.

"It's phenomenal," Hill-Fitzgerald said. "I wouldn't tell any mom not to do this, because it really helps your baby bond with you, even with dads as well."

Deborah Locicero is an RN and Lactation Consultant at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital where they encourage all new parents to practice kangaroo care, especially those with preemies,

"For the baby, it helps regulate their temperature, heart rate, respiration and it's very good for brain growth," Locicero said. "It helps them neurologically, helps them to heal, fights infection."

Hill-Fitzgerald learned it's not just for moms.

"My husband, the first time he did kangaroo time, he said 'awww it's perfect.' He stole three hours away from me," Hill-Fitzgerald said. "I just want you to know that. Put that on the record!

A very loved little girl, getting a very good start.

"It's perfect, it's perfect. I wouldn't change it for the world," Hill-Fitzgerald said. "No, mommy's girl is so perfect for her."

Click or tap here for more information about kangaroo care from Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital.

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