Hurricane Barry Highlights (11 a.m. ET Saturday)

  • Barry has become a Category 1 hurricane with 75 mph winds. Dangerous storm surge, heavy rains and strong winds are expected across the north-central Gulf coast.
  • At 11 a.m. ET Saturday, it was located about 40 miles  south of Lafayette, Louisiana.
  • The storm is moving northwest at 6 mph.
  • For Tampa Bay: Expect minimal impacts, with breezy conditions, slightly higher tides along the coast and periods of heavy rain.

Hurricane Barry Advisories (11 a.m. ET Saturday):

  • A hurricane warning has been issued for the coast of Louisiana from Intracoastal City to Grand Isle. 
  • A tropical storm warning is in effect from the mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle, Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, including metropolitican New Orleans, and Intracoastal city to Sabine Pass.
  • A storm surge warning is in effect from Intracoastal City to Biloxi. A storm surge warning is also in effect for Lake Pontchartrain.
  • A storm surge watch has been issued for Biloxi to the Mississippi/Alabama border.
  • A hurricane watch is in effect from Intracoastal City to Cameron, Louisiana.

Interactive Tropical Tracker

MORE: Click or tap here for interactive radar from 10Weather

MORE: Get breaking news and weather alerts: Download the 10News app

Latest Forecast Cone

RELATED: Tracking Potential Tropical Cyclone Two: Stats, spaghetti models and more

MORE: Tropical development in the Gulf: Your questions answered

Full Hurricane Barry Forecast:

Barry has reached hurricane strength just prior to landfall, with 75 mph winds. As of 11 a.m. ET Saturday, it was located about 40 miles south of Lafayette, Louisiana.

Barry is moving northwest at 6 mph.

Landfall is expected at any time. After that, Barry is expected to turn toward the north on Saturday night or Sunday and through the Mississippi Valley through Sunday night. 

Higher gusts are possible beyond the storm's maximum sustained wind speed of 75 mph. Tropical storm force winds extend 175 miles from the center.

The storm is expected to weaken as it moves inland.

Hurricane Barry warnings and watches:

A hurricane warning is now in effect for the Louisiana coastline. And, that's not nearly the only advisory issued so far. People living from the upper Texas Gulf Coast to the Florida Panhandle should monitor weather forecasts because more advisories could be coming soon.

Hurricane Advisories

  • A hurricane warning has been issued for the coast of Louisiana from Intracoastal City to Grand Isle. 
  • A hurricane watch is in effect from Intracoastal City to Cameron, Louisiana.

Tropical Storm Advisories

  • A tropical storm warning is in effect from the mouth of the Pearl River to Grand Isle, Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas, including metropolitican New Orleans, and Intracoastal city to Sabine Pass.

Storm Surge Advisories

  • A storm surge warning is in effect from Intracoastal City to Biloxi. A storm surge warning is also in effect for Lake Pontchartrain.
  • A storm surge watch has been issued for Biloxi to the Mississippi/Alabama border.

What do Hurricane Barry warnings and watches mean:

A hurricane watch means hurricane conditions are possible in the next 48 hours. A hurricane warning means hurricane conditions are expected within the next 36 hours.

A storm surge warning means rising water may move inland from the coastline and pose life-threatening conditions in the next 36 hours. People living in those areas should take immediate action to protect their lives and property from rising water. If local officials tell you to evacuate, get out.

RELATED: What's the difference between a hurricane watch and a warning?

A storm surge watch means rising water may move inland and pose life-threatening conditions in the next 48 hours.

A tropical storm watch means tropical storm conditions are possible within the next 48 hours.

Hurricane Barry Potential Impacts:

Rainfall has already exceeded 6-9 inches in parts of New Orleans, causing flooding. Forecasters are warning of potential 3- to 6-foot storm surge across parts of the Gulf coast.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Barry is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 10 to 20 inches near and inland of the central Gulf Coast through early next week, with isolated maximum rainfall amounts of 25 inches across portions of eastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi.

A tornado or two is possible through Saturday across the southern parts of Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. 

App users -- tap here if you cannot see the image below.

satellite

The combination of dangerous storm surge and tides will likely cause normally drier areas along the coast to be flooded. If peak storm surge happens at the time of high tide, you could see water at the following heights:

  • Mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Shell Beach: 3 to 5 feet
  • Shell Beach to the Mississippi/Alabama border: 2 to 4 feet
  • Intracoastal City to the mouth of the Atchafalaya River: 3 to 6 feet
  • Lake Pontchartrain: 3 to 5 feet

Click or tap here for interactive radar from 10Weather.

As the system develops, it will track west away from the Florida Peninsula. However, some indirect impacts will still be possible.

This persistent wind out of the south and southwest might result in higher than normal tides; and some minor coastal flooding could be possible. 

In addition to breezy conditions and the threat for minor coastal flooding, the developing system will draw up abundant tropical moisture. Any showers and storms that develop will have the potential to produce locally heavy rain and possibly result in flooding. Generally speaking, flooding as a result of heavy rain is not a major concern for Tampa Bay, but some localized flooding may be seen.

Forecast models are in fairly good agreement of the track of the storm through Saturday morning, but after that, there is a fair amount of divergence in thinking. The spread of the greatest impact stretches from Alabama to Texas with Louisiana and Mississippi right in the middle.

App users -- tap here if you cannot see the image below.

satellite

The European Model, historically one of the more reliable forecast models, strengthens the storm as it approaches the Louisiana Coast into Saturday.

Regardless of development, this system has the potential to produce heavy rainfall along portions of the northern and eastern U.S. Gulf Coast later this week and into the weekend. Some forecasts suggest that rainfall totals could be greater than 1 foot along the central Gulf coast. 

While the focus with a tropical system is often with the wind speeds, flooding rains are often the deadliest hazard. The threat for inland flooding needs to be monitored closely all along the central and eastern Gulf coast. 

In any event, we're well into the swing of hurricane season. It's not too late to prepare a hurricane kit and have a plan in place should a storm threaten the area.

10News is your Hurricane Headquarters:

►Track the weather and get severe alerts when they happen: Download
the 10 News app now.